The roller coaster that is my life

65,024 notes


On being asked if she is a feminist (in light of stars such as Shailene Woodley, Lady Gaga, and Kelly Clarkson rejecting the label): “I don’t think they really understood what feminism is. It’s a right. Feminism, to me, is standing up for everything that someone else has already done for you. My mom has overcome so much in her life. She makes me want to stand up for myself. Stand up to the studio heads who try to tell me that I can’t have blonde hair; they want brown hair. Or I need bigger boobs, or I need to work out. Or I’m too skinny, so, like, ‘Eat a cheeseburger.’ I stand up for myself every day of my life. I grew up in a family of four boys. I’m, like, a born feminist. I’ve been a feminist since I was four years old.” - Chloe Grace Moretz

On being asked if she is a feminist (in light of stars such as Shailene Woodley, Lady Gaga, and Kelly Clarkson rejecting the label): “I don’t think they really understood what feminism is. It’s a right. Feminism, to me, is standing up for everything that someone else has already done for you. My mom has overcome so much in her life. She makes me want to stand up for myself. Stand up to the studio heads who try to tell me that I can’t have blonde hair; they want brown hair. Or I need bigger boobs, or I need to work out. Or I’m too skinny, so, like, ‘Eat a cheeseburger.’ I stand up for myself every day of my life. I grew up in a family of four boys. I’m, like, a born feminist. I’ve been a feminist since I was four years old.” - Chloe Grace Moretz

(Source: ameliajeans, via albinwonderland)

11,994 notes

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.
It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.
Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.
A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.
Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:
Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+
Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 
If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 
BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.

It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.

Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.

A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.

Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:

  • Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
  • Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
  • Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+

Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 

If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 

BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. 
The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

(via aevynne)

59,658 notes

benedoodle-cumberpoodle:

lapfulofmisha:

isabela-stole-my-book:

44% of the audience of Guardians of the Galaxy is female and all the speculation states that women went to see it for Chris Pratt’s body. I don’t think that’s fair. Maybe (and this is crazy) they just like kickass movies with space shit and explosions. Maybe women can do things without men being their motivation. Maybe.

Bless you

I WENT FOR THE TALKING RACCOON MOTHAFUCKAS

(Source: andrastes-ass, via yunging19)

11,184 notes

Emma Watson’s speech in occasion of the “HeForShe” UN campaign launching.

yabanned:

Today we are launching a campaign HeForShe. I am reaching out to you because we need your help. We must try to mobilize as many men and boys as possible to be advocates for change. We don’t just want to talk about it. We want to try and make sure it’s tangible.

I was appointed as Goodwill Ambassador for UN Women 6 months ago.

The more I spoke about feminism, the more I realized that fighting for women’s rights has too often become synonymous with man-hating. If there is one thing I know for certain is that this has to stop. For the record, feminism by definition is the belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of political, economic and social equality of the sexes.

When I was 8, I was called bossy because I wanted to direct a play for our parents. At 15, my girlfriends didn’t want to join sports teams because they didn’t want to appear masculine. At 18, my male friends were unable to express their feelings.

I decided that I was a feminist. This seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word. Women are choosing not to identify as feminists. Apparently, [women’s expression is] seen as too strong, too aggressive, anti-men, unattractive.

Why has the word become such an unpopular one? I think it is right I am paid the same as my male counterparts. I think it is right that I should make decisions about my own body. I think it is right that women be involved on my behalf in the policies and decisions that affect my life. I think it is right that socially, I am afforded the same respect as men.

But sadly, I can say that there is no one country in the world where all women can expect to see these rights. No country in the world can yet say that they achieved gender equality. These rights are considered to be human rights but I am one of the lucky ones.

My life is a sheer privilege because my parents didn’t love me less because I was born a daughter. My school did not limit me because I was a girl. These influences are the gender equality ambassadors that made me who I am today. They may not know it but they are the feminists needed in the world today. We need more of those.

It is not the word that is important. It is the idea and the ambition behind it because not all women received the same rights I have. In fact, statistically, very few have.

In 1997, Hillary Clinton made a famous speech in Beijing about women’s rights. Sadly, many that she wanted to change are still true today. Less than 30% of the audience were male. How can we effect change in the world when only half of it is invited to participate in the conversation?

Men, I would like to give this opportunity to extend your formal invitation. Gender equality is your issue, too. To date, I’ve seen my father’s role as a parent being valued less by society. I’ve seen young men suffering from illness, unable to ask for help for fear it will make them less of a man. I’ve seen men fragile and insecure by what constitutes male success. Men don’t have the benefits of equality, either.

We don’t want to talk about men being imprisoned by gender stereotypes but I can see that they are. When they are free, things will change for women as a natural consequence. If men don’t have to be aggressive, women won’t be compelled to be submissive. If men don’t need to control, women won’t have to be controlled.

Both men and women should feel free to be strong. It is time that we all see gender as a spectrum instead of two sets of opposing ideals. We should stop defining each other by what we are not and start defining ourselves by who we are. We can all be freer and this is what HeForShe is about. It’s about freedom. I want men to take up this mantle so their daughters, sisters and mothers can be free from prejudice but also so their sons have permission to be vulnerable and human, too and in doing so, be a more true and complete version of themselves.

You might think: who is this Harry Potter girl? What is she doing at the UN? I’ve been asking myself at the same thing. All I know is that I care about this problem and I want to make this better. And having seen what I’ve seen and given the chance, I feel my responsibility to say something. Edmund Burke said all that is need for the forces of evil to triumph is for good men and women to do nothing

In my nervousness for this speech and my moment of doubt, I told myself: if not me, who? If not now, when? You have the opportunity here. If you believe in equality, I implore you: we must strive for a united world but the good news is we have a platform. It is called he for she. I invite you to step forward, to be seen and I ask yourself: if not me, who? If not now, when?

Thank you.

(via emmacdwatson)

81,244 notes

socialjusticekoolaid:

Can’t stop, won’t stop: Protesters in Ferguson rally again, seeking justice for Mike Brown. More than a month and a half after his death, his killer, Darren Wilson, is still a free man. (Pt 2) 

Because it wouldn’t be a protest in Ferguson without fuckery from the police. A driver plowed his car through protesters, grazing several and running over a young boys foot. Beyond taking several hours to transport the boy to the hospital, they took even longer to arrest the motorist. Who did they not wait long to arrest? Two of the protesters who had been documenting the altercation for the world to see. If you’re not angry, you’re not paying attention. #staywoke #farfromover #nojusticenopeace

(via benedictscrumblebread)